Prime Prophecy Series

Shy and soft-spoken Eden St. James starts at a new high school, determined to keep a low profile…until her eyes collide with eyes the shade of a seamless summer sky.

Unsure of why she has such a deep connection with the kind, but mysterious Noah, Eden tries to run away from these new feelings as Noah desperately tries to unweave the enigma that is Eden. But this connection has been prophesied since before they took their first breaths.

As secrets are revealed and identities laid bare, Eden must decide whether she will continue to keep her heart locked away, or risk it all for the man who vows to protect her with his life.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Well-written, soft YA books are my happy place. I could just snuggle in my bed with a cup of hot chocolate as the rain pours down with a good, soft, romantic fantasy book in my hands. However, none embodies this feeling better than The Prime Prophecy series by Tamar Sloan.

I love how healthy this relationship was portrayed and how it was formed. There was no struggle for who was the “Alpha” in the relationship, no unnecessary drama, and no toxically overprotective male or passively jealous female. Eden, yes, had faults, but we see in the first book how she is slowly beginning to outgrow her insecurities and tap into her inner strength and confidence. Noah physically became who he was destined to be, and showed resilience with respect toward his father (the Alpha) as he decided to follow what his soul was telling him.

“Noah, you are the one person that can hurt me the most.”

I stroke one thumb across her soft cheek. “I’m the one person you can trust to keep you safe.”

– Tamar Sloan

There was the perfect balance of conflict and resolution without becoming stale. The characters supported each other and grew together, and the author did not forget to show development even in the secondary characters as well! Too often we see the author forget about the secondary characters or believe them to be flawless already.

This love story formed naturally and in a way that just made me as a reader sigh with happiness when I turned the final page of the last book. I have so much respect for Tamar Sloan as such a remarkably talented author and cannot wait to see her next work.

Happy Reading,
~ The Brown-Eyed Bookaholic

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Catching Genesis

Genesis Fairchild has been waiting 18 long years for her mate, only to be rejected by him on her birthday. But just as she is getting ready to throw in the towel on love, a certain silver-eyed Lycan named Constantine corners her and tells her that she is his soulmate.

Genesis is suddenly thrust into a world of Lycan royalty as her inner wolf is making changes of her own. To top it off, the mate who rejected her wants her by his side as his mistress, and his father, the Alpha of her pack, will stop at nothing to make that happen.

Will Genesis be forced to complete the bond with her werewolf mate that only wants her for what she can give him? Or will she be able to choose the Lycan who will cherish her above all? Either way, Genesis will not go down without fighting tooth and claw for what she wants.

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Soulmates? Check. Sassy, strong heroine? Check. Swoon-worthy Alpha? Check.
Different shifter plot? Check.

“You are mine, Genesis. There’s no turning back. I don’t share, and I don’t let go of what’s mine. I won’t give you up.”

-Nicole Riddley, Catching Genesis

This book was such a different take on shifters that I simply had to love it. It takes such a brilliant and inventive author to flip the script on a nearly cemented plot type. You will constantly be surprised about the direction that Riddley takes her characters and will be oh-so-happy with the outcome. It took me a while to open this book but once I got through the first page I could not put it down. Riddley’s heroine Genesis is fierce and stubborn and passionate about what she wants. My only hesitation in giving this a five-star review is due to how Genesis has a very young internal monologue, which while entertaining, can become tiresome over multiple chapters. Constantine is protective, territorial, and supportive of Genesis, and the development of their connection is similar to reality in how it is an “imperfectly perfect” relationship.

Happy Reading,
~The Brown-Eyed Bookaholic

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Elsker

After living out her life in Nehalem, Oregon, Kristia Tostenson decides that she needs a new adventure, especially after the death of her Mormor. She trades her cold, rainy town for the beauty of Cardiff University in Wales and comes face to face with a “blond Adonis” by the name of Ull Myhr. Ull has a secret that spans centuries–he is an honest-to-goodness Norse god–and his fate is destined to end at Ragnarok. Ull is a fighter though and does not accept this fate, especially if it means that he will be separated from his fated love, Kristia.

But Kristia has her own secret, and maybe the visions that she has been having are the key to stopping Ragnarok once and for all.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

I am usually unable to engage with books about gods (Percy Jackson will forever remain on my TBR pile), but this one definitely caught my attention. Not only did it catch my attention, but it stole a full night of sleep from me because I ended up bingeing this trilogy (*oops*). Now, I am a sucker for Norse god literature thanks to S.T. Bende.

I am in love with S.T. Bende’s writing. She writes in a manner that is deep and focused to where the reader forgets that they are holding a book and instead believe that they are in the world with the characters. She adds just enough character/romantic conflict to keep it interesting without causing the drama to be the center of the plot or the characters to have no development. Kristia is strongly written and while she does have intentionally created flaws, she is not the annoying heroine who either needs to be saved or is too strong to ask for help. Bende’s characters are almost human-like with their mannerisms and desires and their motivations. I cannot recommend this book more or commend Bende more highly for her remarkable Elsker series.

Happy Reading,
~The Brown-Eyed Bookaholic

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The Fault in Our Stars vs. Divergent vs. The Hunger Games

Three of the hottest movies from 2014 (which now seems so long ago after the decade that is now “2020”) were based off of award winning books, and as a result the Nerdfighters (The Fault in Our Stars), Initiates (Divergent), and Tributes (The Hunger Games) fandoms were at war on social media sites, classrooms, and occasional coffee shops. Let’s take a page out of The Hunger Games, and set them against eachother to see which is the best book standing. May the odds ever be in *the books* favor.

“The Fault in Our Stars” is written by well-known author and vlogger/historian John Green. It is an emotionally heartfelt story, and can only be described as “[a] rollercoaster that only goes up, my friend.” (Green, 11). Honestly, I was extremely late onto the TFIOS bandwagon because I was not into sappy romances where it is inevitable that a boys ends up with a girl…or so I thought. The book completely took me by surprise. The main character, Hazel Grace, isn’t the usual heroine. She doesn’t have a perfect body, or the captain of the cheer squad. She’s a cancer survivor. And not the damsel-in-distress-look-at-me-suffering brat I would have thought the author would make her out to be. Hazel is a fiery, sarcastic, beautiful-in-her-own-way teenager. Yeah, her lungs suck at being lungs and she’s anti-social but that all changes when fellow survivor Augustus Waters walks into her Support Group. This book is similar to “The Miraculous Tale of Edward Tulane” by Kate DiCamillo, as it jerks an emotional response from the reader, while keeping still them engrossed in the storyline. I am not going to ruin the story for you by explaining the plot (not that you don’t already know the ending), but there has never been a book until TFIOS that has left me pondering life with bittersweet tears in my eyes. And for that Mr. Green, I fervently thank you.
rate: 4.5

Next on our list is “Divergent” by the talented Veronica Roth. The book, in my eyes, was similar to “The Giver”, being that both are based on futuristic worlds and every person had a “place” in society that they were allocated. But the key difference between the books is that in “Divergent”, the characters had a choice, a decision that they themselves make for where they end up. There are five “factions” or cliques to choose from. Abnegation, Erudite, Dauntless, Amity, and Candor. Our protagonist, Tris (Beatrice), fits into the stereotypical “heroine” mold more than TFIOS Hazel Grace. Tris, starts off as a formidable underdog when she finds out she’s “Divergent”, meaning she has no specific faction in which she belongs; her mind works in a million different ways. Being Divergent isn’t something to be proud of, because Erudite wants to maintain a strict order in their world. But as Tris begins her training, she finds that hiding who she is, is easier said than done. This book is successfully incorporates innovative ideas and allows the reader to envision themselves in the setting, fighting alongside Tris. I give props to Veronica Roth, because it takes a lot of imagination to think outside the glass box.
rate: 3

 Similar to Divergent, “The Hunger Games” created by Suzanne Collins in 2008, is seemingly the basis of many recent sci-fi books. But nothing can measure up to the original masterpiece that inspired them all. Personally, while I enjoyed the dialogue between the characters, I wasn’t as huge a fan of this trilogy when I first began to read it and I couldn’t get into the plot as well as I do in other books. But even I can’t deny the aesthetic elaboration that Collins used to illustrate this appealing novel. The Hunger Games is literally a fight to the death, and each district (comparable to the Divergent factions) send one boy and one girl to represent the district. Some districts viewed being chosen as an honor, while some view it as a death sentence. Katniss Everdeen, our courageous leading lady, is one of those that views it as a death sentence, but offers herself as “tribute” in place of her younger sister who was selected to participate in the Games. Before she knows it, Katniss is whisked away to a world of politics while also struggling to survive. Suzanne Collins is an artist when it comes to crafting a suspenseful plot that leaves the reader breathless and begging for more.
rate: 3

Each of these books are unique in their own way and every book generates a barrage of feelings that the reader will cherish to the last page, until they immerse themselves in the plot once more. In the words of one of the greatest authors to this age, Jane Austen, “If a book is well written, I always find it too short.” The Fault in Our Stars, Divergent, and The Hunger Games were all too fleeting but the memories that accompanied them are infinite.

The Girl Who Cried Werewolf

This series is my most recent YA buy and oh my stars I am in love with reading again. The Girl Who Cried Werewolf by Heather Hildenbrand & Bam Shepherd is the first installment in a three-part paranormal romance series. You will fall in love with the main character, Romy, who is a sassy, university student with a book blog.

Girls are going missing around campus, she’s being tracked down by a swoon-worthy werewolf, and to top it off she may have accidentally posted about the existence of werewolves on her blog.

On her way to prove the existence of werewolves to her disbelieving fans, she will stumble into a world more dangerous than her own paranormal romance books could have prepared her for.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

This is the first time I will do this, but I am going to rate this book 5 ★. That is how amazing it is. You will not only adore Romy, but you will want to be best friends with her wild friends, Anna and Talia. You will wish that Kash was your own #bookboyfriend. The best part is this series gets so much better throughout the rest of the books, and I did not know that was even possible. I almost started tearing up a bit when I finished this series because I wanted more. Hildenbrand and Shepherd did not pull any punches when writing this series, as there are so many aspects of this book that will appeal to a wide variety of readers.

This book is actually what inspired me to revamp my bookstagram and commit to it full-time. That, readers, bibliophiles, and bashful bookworms, is how you know it is a good YA book. When it is able to inspire you to do something outside of your comfort zone or even encourage you to work on yourself to become a better you, is the mark of a phenomenal book. I am now a Hildenbrand and Shepherd fan for life. I hope you enjoy this book as much as I do, and look forward to hearing your thoughts on this book too!

Happy Reading,
~the Brown-Eyed Bookaholic

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